Remembering a special friend


An easy way to leave a legacy

We all desire significance—to lead happy and fulfilled lives surrounded by family and friends. For many of us, there is a compelling need to make a difference—to leave a lasting impact on the people most dear to us and the world in which we live.

The search for significance and desire to plan for the future leads many to ponder their legacy. What kind of legacy will you leave?

A bequest is perhaps the easiest and most tangible way to have a lasting impact on the people and organizations that mean the most to you. A bequest may also be an effective way to make a gift to your church and lessen the burden of taxes on your family and estate.

A charitable bequest directs a gift to be made through your will or trust to a qualified charity, such as your church. It allows you to support your church after you are gone, ensuring ministry for the next generation.

A bequest to your church or ministry can also help you save estate taxes by providing your estate with a charitable deduction for the value of the gift. With careful planning, your family can also avoid paying income taxes on the assets they receive from your estate.

Sample language for your attorney

I give and bequeath to The Oklahoma United Methodist Foundation, Inc., an Oklahoma, not-for-profit, tax-exempt corporation, as a permanent endowment, ____ percent of my gross estate, for the benefit of (your United Methodist Church ) .

The Oklahoma United Methodist Foundation recently said goodbye to staff member Jane Stewart. She passed away on Sept. 25 after a long battle with cancer.

Jane worked in the Foundation’s Tulsa office for more than 12 years and most recently worked out of a satellite office at Bartlesville Oak Park United Methodist Church. It is difficult to articulate her value and significance to the Foundation. She worked closely with all staff members, especially planned-giving staff and donors, and she will be greatly missed.

Because the Foundation staff is few in number, everyone works together on many projects. Jane was more like family than a co-worker, sharing everything from her love of theater and sports to her dedication and loyalty to the Foundation’s mission.

"Among Jane’s many gifts were her incredible organizational skills," said David Battles, executive vce president for the Foundation. "She scheduled all of my appointments each December, which included 30 to 40 visits during a two- or three-week period. She was so efficient she even scheduled breaks, something we both laughed about later. She also had a great sense of humor."

Over the years, Jane got to know many of our donors in the Tulsa area on a first-name basis. She developed close relationships with many of them, and they would often ask how she was doing.

"Jane managed her illness much like her work for the Foundation, with a truly gracious spirit which inspired each of us. She was a very special friend, and I already miss her smile," said Battles.

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