What every church should know about poverty seminar

WhenTuesday, October 24, 2017
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What every church should know about poverty
 
Tuesday, October 24, 2017
First UMC, OKC (131 NW 4th Street—on the corner of 4th & Robinson with access off of 5th Street, across from the OKC National Memorial)
9 a.m. – registration
9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. – seminar
CEU’s will be offered
Sponsors – Oklahoma Conference UMC (Discipleship MT, Mission and Service MT) and OKUMF
Cost - $25/person (includes the seminar, snacks and the book What Every Church Member Should Know About Poverty by Bill Ehlig and Dr. Ruby K. Payne).  We will not have a lunch. 

Seminar description – The What Every Church Member Should Know About Poverty workshop provides information and issues to increase knowledge and awareness of the culture of poverty, and ways that churches may minister to individuals from poverty.  Topics include the hidden rules of middle class, language patterns and cognition, violence and conflict resolution, family and relationship building and church participation. Participants will discuss how to invite poverty groups as members and explore the issues surrounding the transition and integration of these groups into the church community. This workshop is based on the book, What Every Church Member Should Know About Poverty by Bill Ehlig and Dr. Ruby K. Payne. This workshop is designed for members of the faith community, ministers, and church staff members.
 
Focus Areas of the UMC
Engaging in Ministry with the Poor
Christ calls us to be in ministry with the poor and marginalized. Our emphasis is on “with” – standing with those who are regarded as “the least of these,” listening to them, understanding their needs and aspirations, and working with them to achieve their goals. It also means addressing the causes of poverty and responding in ways that lift up individuals and communities. United Methodists believe working side by side with those striving to improve their situation is more effective long term than top-down charity